BEHIND THE SCENES:

THE SHOEBOX EP

Going into a professional studio for the first time was unnerving, challenging, frustrating — but it was also a mad adventure, a six-month collection of late nights, of vocal cords soothed with honey and fingers sore from playing riffs over and over. Hearing something that you've held back for so long come to life, piece by piece, is a humbling thing, a magnificent thing, no matter how simple or complicated the thing itself. It's one of the greatest experiences an artist can have, and I had it because of you.

I can't wait to do it again.

Thank you

 xx P

 

STUDIO REEL

Gathered in the reel below you'll find scattered moments from the nearly 6-month process of recording the EP, from the very first scratch vocal track to the final song mixes. It was a long journey, and I'm so happy to share it all with you.

 

STUDIO SNAPSHOTS

Take a peek into what recording looked like from my point of view — from the booth to the console.

One of the very first sessions for the EP at Sweetsounds, scratch-tracking the first song, Antidote. 

One of the very first sessions for the EP at Sweetsounds, scratch-tracking the first song, Antidote. 

The lovely sunset view from one of the live recording rooms at Sweetsounds. Hello, SoHo.

The lovely sunset view from one of the live recording rooms at Sweetsounds. Hello, SoHo.

This room at Flux Studios became our home for most of our summer 2016 sessions. Recording vocals, working out electric guitar riffs, listening back for tiny hitches in each song — this was the birthplace of most of the EP.

This room at Flux Studios became our home for most of our summer 2016 sessions. Recording vocals, working out electric guitar riffs, listening back for tiny hitches in each song — this was the birthplace of most of the EP.

I really came to be so fond of this tiny little booth — I often watched the late afternoon sun fade to early evening standing here, singing my heart out into a mic. It felt like the carpet, the walls, all absorbed the crazy emotion I was giving off in that room.

I really came to be so fond of this tiny little booth — I often watched the late afternoon sun fade to early evening standing here, singing my heart out into a mic. It felt like the carpet, the walls, all absorbed the crazy emotion I was giving off in that room.

I remember this very clearly, because it was our last day tracking at Flux. I was thrilled — recording had taken months longer than I thought — but it was bittersweet. The booth and the mix room had become sacred spaces for me, and it was hard to leave.

I remember this very clearly, because it was our last day tracking at Flux. I was thrilled — recording had taken months longer than I thought — but it was bittersweet. The booth and the mix room had become sacred spaces for me, and it was hard to leave.

In November, in the wake of a tumultuous national election, I felt seized by a song I'd been tinkering with on and off. I finished writing it within the week, and recorded it with Justin within the next week. That song ended up being Morning, the bonus track on the Shoebox EP.

In November, in the wake of a tumultuous national election, I felt seized by a song I'd been tinkering with on and off. I finished writing it within the week, and recorded it with Justin within the next week. That song ended up being Morning, the bonus track on the Shoebox EP.

A hot June night of tracking grueling vocals until 1am. You can bet I went to bed with a bottle of honey.

A hot June night of tracking grueling vocals until 1am. You can bet I went to bed with a bottle of honey.

Early days yet, but it was hard for me to believe I was really behind a microphone, recording songs I'd only ever sung between the walls of my bedroom.

Early days yet, but it was hard for me to believe I was really behind a microphone, recording songs I'd only ever sung between the walls of my bedroom.

In November, I was lucky enough to work with an incredible quartet of strings players on Who I Can't Have. I went home to Boston to record them on-location.

In November, I was lucky enough to work with an incredible quartet of strings players on Who I Can't Have. I went home to Boston to record them on-location.

I still can't put into words the feeling of hearing these strings give my simple little arrangement so much emotion and depth. (There were definitely tears.)

I still can't put into words the feeling of hearing these strings give my simple little arrangement so much emotion and depth. (There were definitely tears.)

One of many late nights spent at Flux. I loved the quiet moments — setting up, breaking down, feeling like it was just me and my music in a bubble away from the world.

One of many late nights spent at Flux. I loved the quiet moments — setting up, breaking down, feeling like it was just me and my music in a bubble away from the world.

The setup to record Morning was very deliberate on my part: I wanted it to be dark, with a hint of light. Hence: the low studio lights and nearly a dozen candles scattered around the live room.

The setup to record Morning was very deliberate on my part: I wanted it to be dark, with a hint of light. Hence: the low studio lights and nearly a dozen candles scattered around the live room.

 

SONG COMMENTARY